Meeting One (April 10, 2007)

September 5, 2006

Welcome to PCC 70-290 Spring term!

70-290 Schedule v1

Intro PPT Show

70-290 Chapter 1 Concept Map

70-290 Chapter 1 PowerPoint Show

PCC Spring Term Academic Calendar

Textbook Answers

Lab Answers File

Supplemental Information:

Download Virtual PC 2007 here

Almost everything you want to know about Microsoft Virtualization

Microsoft Virtual PC vs. Microsoft Virtual Server

32-bit vs. 64-bit Windows

The 32-bit memory address space of Windows XP 32-bit and Windows Server 2003 32-bit editions should only accomodate 4 Gigabytes of RAM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/32-bit). However, something called Physical Address Extension allows a 32-bit processor, with some help from the operating system, to address up to 64 Gigabytes of RAM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension).

A 64-bit processor can address 16 exabytes of RAM, with no translation mechanism necessary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/64-bit). This is why the 64-bit versions of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 can handle much larger amounts of physical RAM.

Getting rid of the Windows Vista boot loader

http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/1040/vista_how_to_uninstall_vista_dual_boot_machine

Microsoft Product Activiation
Microsoft’s general blurb about the technology behind product activation

Interesting but old article about product activation technology

This FAQ from Microsoft gets as close as I’ve seen to real details about how product activation works:

What are the 10 hardware characteristics used to determine the hardware hash?

The 10 hardware characteristics used to determine the hardware hash are: Display Adapter, SCSI Adapter, IDE Adapter, Network Adapter MAC Address, RAM Amount Range (i.e. 0-64mb, 64-128mb, etc), Processor Type, Processor Serial Number, Hard Drive Device, Hard Drive Volume Serial Number, CD-ROM/CD-RW/DVD-ROM.

Using USB devices during the Server 2003 Setup:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/916196/en-us

The best information I have found indicates that for loading special drivers during the 2003 setup, you have three options:

  1. Use a floppy disk
  2. Use an external USB floppy disk
  3. Integrate the drivers to the 2003 setup using a tool like the Microsoft OEM Preinstallation Kit (OPK) or (unsupported) utils like NLite.

It appears that Vista will support other types of USB storage as a driver source for the install process.

Here’s the source for this information:

Matt Davis — MSFT (Moderator):
Q: Will there be a support for adding mass storage drivers to floppyless systems for example pressing F6 and installing the driver from any usb device?
A: Are you asking about if this support will be in Vista or updated/included in Windows XP or Server 2003? For Vista, yes, we will allow USB based devices to include updated mass storage controllers due to the re-architecting of Setup which has taken place. For the XP/Server 2003 timeframe it’s still F6/floppy or include the mass storage controllers in a custom OPK and in your configuration set when preinstalling using the OPK/WinPE.

180-day Eval Software from Microsoft:
Regarding the 180-day eval copies of 2003 Server provided with the 70-290 book:

From Microsoft’s FAQ on the eval software:

Q. I recently installed the 180-day trial version of Windows Server 2003 R2. When I buy the full version of this software, will I have to install it over the trial software?

A. Yes. After the 180-day trial period, you will have to install the full version (that is, non-evaluation) product.


Q. Can I use the Product Key that is included when I buy a copy of the full version (that is, non-evaluation) product to remove the 180-day limit instead of installing the full version product?

A. No. You must install the full version of the product. The new Product Key will not override the 180-day limit on the evaluation software. When you install the full version product, select the Upgrade option when prompted during setup. This will keep the settings you established when you installed the evaluation version of the software.

For Thursday’s class, you’ll be well prepared if you have read Chapters 1 and 2 of the book. We’ll overview Active Directory and delve into server administration via MMC and the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP). See you then!